Award Winners

WVGC AWARD WINNERS FOR 2016-2017

AWARD #1.THE WEST VIRGINIA GARDEN CLUB AWARD

Winner: Fred Brooks Garden Club for their work with students in grades K-12 on environmental education centering on frogs

AWARD # 2: THE COUNCIL CUP

Winner: Harrison County Garden Council. Since the 1980’s they have been delivering bud vase arrangements every week to patients at the Veteran’s hospital in Clarksburg.

AWARD #3: THE VIRGINIA C. MABLEY AWARD

Winner: Joyce Gardner Lee for the countless hours she has devoted to her club, Tu-Endie-Wei.

AWARD #4A: BEAUTIFICATION AWARDS – ROCKWELL SMALL CLUB BEAUTIFICATION AWARD

Winner: Gateway Garden Club for the beautiful new Gateway Children’s Garden in Martinsburg.

AWARD #4B: BEAUTIFICATION AWARDS – CUNNINGHAM LARGE CLUB AWARD

Winner: Phymosia Garden Club for the planting and maintenance of the Bowers Hospice House center courtyard for the last 11 years.

AWARD #5: LORETTA LIVELY COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT AWARD

Winner: Gateway Garden Club for the new children’s garden in Martinsburg.

AWARD #6: SARA H. TOWNSEND LANDSCAPE DESIGN AWARD

Winner: Gateway Garden Club for the Gateway Children’s Garden

AWARD #7: GENEVIEVE PAYNE AWARD FOR GARDEN THERAPY (Trophy Missing)

Winner: Phymosia Garden Club for their work with senior garden therapy at the Wildwood Apartments with assisted living in Beckley.

AWARD #8: THE ASHWORTH ARBOR DAY AWARD

Winner: Fred Brooks Garden Club for the tree planting project at Hodgesville Elementary School.

AWARD #9: THE JIMELLE F. WALKER RHODODENDRON AWARD

Winner: The Olde Berkeley Garden for the planting of a rhododendron grove at War Memorial Park in Martinsburg.

AWARD #10: THE McDONALD AWARD FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION

Winner: Lewisburg House & Garden for the repair and preservation of the “Angel of Death” sculpture in Lewisburg

AWARD #11: THE BIRD PRESERVATION AWARD

Winner: Gateway Garden Club for the Bird’s Nest Learning Center at the Gateway Children’s Garden

AWARD #12: NATIONAL GARDENER’S SUBSCRIPTION AWARD

Winner: Old Trails for having the largest percentage of member subscriptions to the National Gardener

AWARD #13: AWARD FOR ARTICLE ON GARDENING

Winner: Jane Lundblad, Nancy Mason and Roann Wojcik of North Hills Garden Club for their article entitled “Gateway to an Abundant Future”

AWARD #14: PUBLICITY PRESSBOOK AWARDS

#14B: Winner – Lewisburg House & Garden

#14C: Winner: Emma Scott Garden Club

AWARD #16: AWARD OF MERIT CITATION

Winner: Terri Michael of Gateway Garden Club for her for her commitment to the success of all levels of garden club membership.

AWARD #18: THE ELEANOR W. CAIN MEMORIAL AWARD

Winner: Tu-Endie-Wei Garden Club for their continuing maintenance and improvement of the Blue Star Memorial Marker in Historical Gunn Park.

AWARD #18 HONORABLE MENTION

Even though the committee agreed that this project did not technically meet the parameters of this award, I would like to present an Honorable Mention Award to the Monongahela-Cheat District for their Blue Star Marker placed at Grafton National Cemetery and the beautiful dedication ceremony they presented. It was truly moving.

AWARD #20: ARNDT AWARD FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION

Winner: Gateway Garden Club for their three years of work to produce a wonderful educational experience at the Gateway children’s Garden which contains over 10 learning centers.

AWARD #21: THE SHIREY CONSERVATION AND PRESERVATION OF BUTTERFLIES AWARD

Winner: Greenbrier Heights Garden Club for their improvements to the existing Greenbrier Heights Neighborhood Butterfly Garden to qualify the garden to become officially Monarch Waystation #11582.

AWARD #22: THE BRENDA MOORE MEMBERSHIP AWARD

Winner: Cranberry Garden Club with 11 new members

 

YEARBOOK AWARDS

AWARD #K1. YEARBOOK AWARD: CLUBS OF UP TO/INCLUDING 24 MEMBERS

Winner: Paden City Garden Club

AWARD #K2. YEARBOOK AWARD; CLUBS OF UP TO 25 OR MORE MEMBERS

Winner: Hill and Hollow Garden Club

AWARD #K3. OTHER YEARBOOK CONSIDERED MERITORIOUS

Winner: Huntington Garden Club

 

PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS

AWARD #P2: PLANT THE SEEDS – MOST MILKWEED SPECIES

Winner: Greenbrier Heights Garden Club for Monarch Waystation #11582

AWARD #P3: STARTING A YOUTH GARDEN CLUB

Winner: Emma Scott Garden Club for work with youth at Elkins Mountain School

AWARD #P4: OUTSTANDING PROJECT DEALING WITH AN ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUE

Winner: Gateway Garden Club Children’s Learning Garden at Gateway Children’s Garden

AWARD #P5: Embracing the NGC Theme “Leap Into Action” this award is for a club that has made a difference in the lives of their members and others in the community

Winner: Indian Rock Garden Club for their many varied unique programs embracing the theme

AWARD #P6: FRIGHTENED FROG PROGRAM

Winner: Fred Brooks Garden Club for their extensive environmental project centering on frogs

FLOWER SHOW AWARDS

AWARD #F1: GOLD MEDALLION FOR BEST DISTRICT OR COUNCIL SHOW

Winner: Harrison County Garden Council

AWARD #F3A: GOLD MEDALLION FOR BEST MINIMUM STANDARD SHOW

Winner: Emma Scott Garden Club

AWARD #F3B: GOLD MEDALLION FOR BEST MINIMUM STANDARD SHOW

Winner: Harrison County Garden Council

AWARD #F7: GOLD MEDALLION FOR A FLOWER SHOW STAGED IN A PUBLIC BUILDING

Winner: Harrison County Garden Council

 

YOUTH AWARDS

HIGH SCHOOL ESSAY CONTEST

Winner: Ben Talbott, sponsored by Quiet Dell Garden Club

SMOKEY BEAR/ WOODSY OWL CONTEST 1st GRADE

Winner: Owen Allport , sponsored by High Country Garden Club

SMOKEY BEAR/ WOODSY OWL CONTEST 2nd GRADE

Winner: Aubrie Spencer, sponsored by High Country Garden Club

SMOKEY BEAR/ WOODSY OWL CONTEST 3rd GRADE

Winner: Brody Radford, sponsored by Country Roads Garden Club

SMOKEY BEAR/ WOODSY OWL CONTEST 4th GRADE

Winner: Jesse Clark, sponsored by High Country Garden Club

SMOKEY BEAR/ WOODSY OWL CONTEST 5th GRADE

Winner: Noah Lambert, sponsored by High Country Garden Club

YOUTH SCULPTURE AWARD 4th GRADE

Winner: Kevin Ruiz, sponsored by Gateway Garden Club

YOUTH SCULPTURE AWARD 5th GRADE

Winner: Andrew Sisk, sponsored by Gateway Garden Club

CAROLYN G. PATTERSON AWARD FOR EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE

Winner: Lubeck Elementary Conservation Club, sponsored by Lubeck Acres Garden Club

YOUTH POETRY CONTEST 1st GRADE

Winner: Toby Wagoner, sponsored by Emma Scott Garden Club

YOUTH POETRY CONTEST 2nd GRADE

Winner: Brenlyn Richmond, sponsored by Country Roads Garden Club

YOUTH POETRY CONTEST 3rd GRADE

Winner: Isabelle Wilke, sponsored by Emma Scott Garden Club

YOUTH POETRY CONTEST 4TH GRADE

Winner: Boden Shepherd, sponsored by Gateway Garden Club

YOUTH POETRY CONTEST 5th GRADE

Winner: Alexandra Barrickman, sponsored by Emma Scott Garden Club

YOUTH POETRY CONTEST 6th GRADE

Winner: Kendall Shedherd, sponsored by Gateway Garden Club

YOUTH POETRY CONTEST 9th GRADE

Winner: Grant K. Shepherd, sponsored by Gateway Garden Club

 


 

 

“Don’t Let the Frogs Croak”

Sabrina Shroades

29 Arbor Shade Drive

Inwood, WV 25428

304-820-7856

Musselman High School

12th Grade

Shenandoah-Potomac Garden District

 

 

One of my favorite signs of spring is the peepers.  The spring peepers are actually male frogs singing to attract female frogs for mating.  The spring peepers are very important to the frog population.  Why do we need these frogs?  Tadpoles are young frogs that help to keep the water clean by feeding on algae.  Adult frogs eat a lot of insects including mosquitoes.  Frogs also are an important food source for many predators, including fish, snakes, and birds.  If frogs disappear, then the food system would be disturbed.

Frogs are called bio-indicators, which mean that their health reflects the health of the environments they live in.  Many frogs need a suitable habitat and have permeable skin that easily absorbs toxic chemicals.  Because of this, frogs are very susceptible to disturbances in their environment.  Frogs are considered to be accurate indicators of environmental stress.  Frogs have been around for more than 250 million years, but now one-third of the amphibian species are on the verge of extinction.  This is a disturbing warning sign that something is very wrong with the environment.

Frogs are very important for a variety of reasons.  Frogs have been used a lot in medical research.  Many Nobel prizes in medicine and physiology have involved the study of frogs.  Andre Geim received a Nobel Prize in 2000 for using the magnetic properties of water scaling to levitate a small frog with magnets.  The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2012 went jointly to John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent.  They used frogs in their study.  This is just a small list of Nobel Prize winners who were assisted by the frog.

There have been many medical studies done on different species of frogs and with each species they find different cures. Unfortunately, some frogs that have medical benefits have already become extinct. One such frog had a possible cure for stomach ulcers.  In the 1970’s Australian scientists discovered the Gastric Brooding Frog.  This frog swallowed its fertilized eggs and newly hatched tadpole’s whole.  The frog’s stomach would incubate the frogs until they were fully formed.   When the frogs were ready to be born, the mother vomits them up.  Scientists had hoped to study the frog’s special incubating stomach to find potential new discoveries that could be used in human medicine.  However in the early 1980’s the gastric brooding frogs disappeared.

Frogs are also used in medicine for chemical compounds found in their skin secretions.  These skin secretions are being studied for their human benefits including non-addictive painkillers, relaxants, appetite suppressants and even treatment for cancer.  Some frogs have antimicrobial peptides in their secretions that fight against strains of E.coli and Staphylococcus aureus, which can be fatal to humans.  If scientists can separate the peptides and use them in medicine, they could find a cure for these infections.  Frogs are also used in schools for dissection to teach students about the anatomy of animals.  As you can see, it’s not easy being green.

Did you know that a species of frog located in the Alaskan boreal is being intensively studied?  This species of frog can die during hibernation and then come back to life in the spring.  Scientists are studying these frogs to see how they can preserve their bodies when they aren’t alive.  Figuring out how the frog does this will help scientists with preserving transplant organs.  This would be a huge benefit for many people who need organ transplants but don’t have the time to wait for one to become available.

What can we do to help the frogs?  We can buy organic foods when possible to cut down on harmful chemicals that affect the frog habitat.  Also, we can support organizations that work to research and save the frogs.  One easy thing we can all do is to educate our friends and family on the importance of protecting frogs.  Please, don’t let the frogs croak!